Undervalued Yet Undeterred: Indian Farmers Protest Continues

Photo by Randeep Maddoke from Wikimedia Commons

By Isana Raja
Staff Writer

Since August of 2020, thousands of farmers across India have taken to the streets in protest. Sleeping on the side of the road in their tractors, enduring the cold, rain, and retaliation from police, has not deterred these farmers. Though the heart of these demonstrations is located in the capital of New Delhi, the movement has permeated every major city. The Indian Farmers Protest started as a few small-scale protests in the state of Punjab. It only took a month for farmers unions across the various states of India to join in on the demonstrations, marching in solidarity to Delhi. The movement calls for the repealment of three agriculture laws passed by Prime Minister Modi in September. The protesters believe these agricultural reforms aim to prioritize corporate interests, in turn, hurting small farmers and their livelihoods. 

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Op-Ed: The Strategic Shifts Caused by Nord Stream 2 and What the United States Can Do Moving Forward

Photo by Chris LeBoutillier from Pexels

By Shawn Rostker
Staff Writer

The Russian Federation has a history of using energy policy as a coercive tool of foreign policy. This practice dates back to the late 1980’s before the collapse of the Soviet Union. It continued through the early years of the newly formed Russian state as it sought to rebuild from economic ruin. Moscow, in its contemporary form, continues to exercise this practice as it seeks to capitalize on its natural abundance of oil and natural gas reserves. Currently, Russia boasts the world’s largest proven reserves of natural gas with roughly 48 trillion cubic meters. According to the Central Intelligence Agency’s most recent figures it is also the world’s number one annual exporter of natural gas at over 210 billion cubic meters. While the playbook may not be new, the Russian state is not the same player that the Soviet Union was. The Soviet Union struggled to implement these tactics effectively due to an incompetent central planning system, disjointed leadership structures, and their failure to adequately maintain technological progress due to a lack of incentive schemes. Over the course of the last twenty years, however, Russia has consolidated its energy industries under state purview, established a vertically-oriented ladder of leadership, provided incentive and opportunity for innovation, and strengthened its economic might through integration into global markets. These characteristics enable Russia to behave more subversively within bilateral partnerships. 

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Rising Up and Reinventing the Playing-Field: Addressing Gender-Based Violence and Disparity Against Women in Honduras

Credit: REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

By Shirin Asgari
Staff Writer

Globally, Honduras has one of the highest incidences of violence against women. It is reported that sixty-four percent of women living in Honduras have been subject to either a direct threat or an attack at least once in their lives. Additionally, this violence is inflicted either by someone within a woman’s social circles or by gang members, and can take the form of rape, femicide, disappearances, as well as physical and physiological abuse. Honduras further lacks any specialized structures to ensure the prevention, protection, and prosecution of violence against women. For instance, a statistical average taken over the course of six years found that around 93.5 percent of femicide cases within the country have gone unpunished. High rates of impunity feed into the perpetuation of this cycle, normalizing and facilitating such attitudes and actions which stem from the country’s machismo culture.      

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