MOROCCO: THE JEWEL OF NORTH AFRICA

By Logan Ma
Contributing Writer

This is the second article in our 2015 Week of Photo Journals: Changing Perspectives. Check back each day this week to see more beautiful photography and travel accounts from UC San Diego students. Click on the images in the article to view the photos up close.

Old Traditions

Old Traditions

In a country where Islamic traditions run deep, Moroccan women are still expected to dress modestly. Recent years have seen a growing interest in Western fashion among the urban youth, but it is still common for women to wear clothes that cover themselves from head to toe.

Saadin Tombs

Saadian Tombs

These tombs are part of a larger mausoleum complex that is the final resting place of dozens of members of the Saadi Dynasty. From their capital in Marrakech, the Saadians resisted encroachments by Christian invaders from the North and the Ottoman Turks from the East, ensuring Morocco remained an independent kingdom generations after their demise. After they fell from power in 1659, their tombs faded from memory until rediscovery in 1917.

Ben Youssef Madrasa

In ancient times, scholars congregated in theological colleges called madrasas to ponder the intricacies of Islam. Nowadays, they are some of the few religious buildings open to non-Muslims. Founded in the 14th century, the Ben Youssef Madrasa in Marrakech was one of the largest in North Africa. As per Islamic custom, Koranic inscriptions and geometric patterns decorate its walls in place of human or animal representations.

A night in Jemaa el-Fnaa

A visit to the old city of Marrakech is incomplete without stopping at Jemaa el-Fnaa, its main square. As night falls, the dozens of food stalls fill the square, offering delicious meals ranging from tagine and cous cous to sheep heads and snail soup. Stall 46’s tanjia, or slow-cooked lamb, is a must-try.

Into the Sahara

A Bedouin guide leads a line of camel-riding tourists to a campsite in the Erg Chebbi dunes. Though frigid December nights make for a chilly stay, good company, delicious Bedouin food and the view of the nighttime stars more than make up for the physical discomforts.

Tagine

A savory stew, tagine is a common item found on a Moroccan menu. Named for the cone-shaped clay bowl in which it is made, tagine typically consists of sliced meat, poultry, or fish slow-cooked with vegetables and fruit. This picture depicts a lemon chicken tagine served with dates.

The Gates of Fes

A day in Fes usually begins by passing through Bab Rcif, one of the 39 babs—or gates—found along the walls the old city. Along with Marrakech and Meknes, Fes is one of the old imperial cities of Morocco.

Carpet Shop

A local man works the loom in a traditional Moroccan carpet shop. Morocco is a shopper’s paradise where one can buy high-quality handmade goods for cheap. There are no set prices — all transactions are conducted by bargaining.

Leather Tanneries

Leather Tanneries

Fes’s famed leather tanneries are one of the city’s most visited attractions. For a small fee, local shopkeepers will allow you to view the multi-colored spectacle from one of the many balconies overlooking the tanneries. Be prepared for a pungent odor.

Bou Inania Madrasa

Bou Inania Madrasa

Intricate carvings adorn the entry hall of the 14th century Bou Inania Madrasa. Like the Ben Youssef Madrasa in Marrakech, this building functioned as a religious educational institute.

Protective Walls

Protective Walls

As one of Moroccan’s imperial cities, Fes’s rulers took great pains to fortify it. Five miles of massive walls surround the old city, protecting it from all sides.

Pastilla

Pastilla

Pastilla, a gastronomic specialty of Fes, is a meat pie traditionally made with pigeon and coated with powdered sugar. Nowadays, they are commonly made from chicken, though some restaurants still offer the pigeon variety.

The Holy City

The Holy City of Moulay Idriss

An hour away from Fes sits the picturesque hilltop city of Moulay Idriss. One of Morocco’s holiest sites, it was here that the Arab prince Moulay Idriss laid the foundation for the kingdom of Morocco. A great-great grandson of the Prophet Muhammad, Moulay Idriss fled to Morocco after a failed attempt to overthrow the Abbasid Caliphate. He founded the Idrisid dynasty and brought Islam to the region. After his death, his subjects laid him to rest in the city that now bears his name.

Meknes after rain

Meknes After Rain

The main square of Meknes after an afternoon shower. Following the overthrow of the Saadian dynasty by the Alaouites, Moulay Ismail moved the capital of Morocco from Marrakech to Meknes. Though his successor moved the capital back to Marrakech after his death, the Moroccan king managed to fill the city with hundreds of monuments that still stand as a testament to Meknes’s golden age.

Market Day

Market Day

Visitors to Fes and Marrakech cannot help but feel overwhelmed by the ceaseless attention directed at them by the locals. Not so in Meknes, a city off the beaten path. As only small numbers of tourist visit the city, the vendors are more concerned with doing business with locals and generally leave foreigners alone.

the blue city

Chefchaouen, the Blue City

A four-hour bus ride from Meknes takes you to the mountaintop village of Chefchaouen. In the old days, it was a haven for Jewish refugees escaping from the Spain Inquisition. The Jews have since left, but their traditions remain. The majority of buildings in the old medina retain a coat of blue—the color of divinity in Judaism. It is this ubiquitous characteristic that drives thousands of backpackers to Chefchaouen each year.

ICELAND: THE COUNTRY OF FIRE AND ICE

By Natasha Azevedo
Contributing Writer

This is the first article in our 2015 Week of Photo Journals: Changing Perspectives. Check back each day this week to see more beautiful photography and travel accounts from UC San Diego students. Click on the images in the article to view the photos up close.

One week after my arrival in Iceland, I had already: jumped off a 30-foot cliff into Iceland’s most dangerous river; rafted through the rapids of Hvíta; caught a geyser erupting near Þingvellir National Park; rode an Icelandic horse through lava fields; and photographed three separate waterfalls on the south coast. For two months I was fortunate enough to work as a photojournalist and marketing intern for Arctic Adventures, one of Iceland’s main tourism companies. I’m still quite confused on how I ended up there, but my penchant for hopping on planes alone gave me another summer of incredible solo adventures, making Iceland one of my favorite countries thus far.

Þórsmörk Valley

Þórsmörk Valley

As the company’s summer photographer, I primarily conducted my work across Iceland’s incredible landscapes, shooting out in the field about four times per week. This first photo was taken on a nine-hour hike through Þórsmörk, known as the Valley of Thor (as in Thor from Marvel’s Avengers). Rightfully named, there was nothing but thunder and hail for a six-hour vertical climb until the skies cleared for 10 magical minutes and this rainbow emerged.

Skogafoss

Skogafoss

One of Iceland’s most iconic waterfalls for international tourists, Skogafoss is truly a sight to see. Iceland doesn’t believe in fencing off the wilderness, partly due to the constant shifts in the environment. You’ll catch glimpses of Icelanders and tourists alike swimming in nearby pools, or even jumping off the smaller waterfalls in the north.

Landmannalaugar

Landmannalaugar

Easily one of my favorite places in Iceland, Landmannalaugar is a jewel of the highlands. This photograph captures the natural hot springs that emerge in the region, where geothermal activity makes springs like these a Jacuzzi for hikers taking day trips.

Skaftafell Glacier Lagoon

Skaftafell Glacier Beach

Skaftafell Glacier Lagoon and Beach

Skaftafell is a key location for volcanic activity in Iceland, largely situated near Vatnajökull Glacier. After hiking Skaftafell’s glaciers for a few hours with a group of Japanese tourists, I accompanied a guide to the famous glacier lagoon. As glacier chunks melt, a small river carries the pieces to a beach on the opposite side of the lagoon. With only 20 minutes left before I had to board a ship, I sprinted over to the beach to capture the beautiful simplicity of these giant glacier pieces.

Laugavegur Trail

Laugavegur Trail

Laugavegur Trail

Laugavegur Trail

Laugavegur Trail

One week of my stay was dedicated to embarking on one of National Geographic’s Dream Treks: the Laugavegur trail. The 36-mile trek was brutally breathtaking: my legs turned orange and green from crossing glacial rivers on foot, several hours were characterized by thick fog and hail, and the ground constantly changed from snow to ice to mud. While the trek transported me into a different world, where herds of horses galloped by and picturesque valleys emerged at every turn, travelers should be cautioned to take a guide, as memorials dot the landscape to remember solo nature enthusiasts who could not prevail against the harsh weather conditions.

Gulfoss Flows

Gulfoss Flows

Day trips to famous waterfalls were some of my favorite days throughout the summer, when I could stare at beautiful falls such as Gulfoss. Gulfoss is the iconic destination in Iceland’s Golden Circle, the most popular area for tourists each summer.

Seljalandsfoss

Seljalandsfoss

If you’ve ever searched “Iceland” on Google Images, Seljalandsfoss will be the first waterfall to appear. One can walk all the way around the waterfall, as a cave lets you go beneath the falls. Icelandic parents often tell their young children that trolls are in the cave in order to deter them from getting too close; mythical legends of trolls and fairies are fun tales that Icelanders enjoy. Seljalandsfoss is one of hundreds of waterfalls that scatter the south coast. As you drive along the main highway, one can easily observe six waterfalls cascading from the cliffs along the road in merely 10 minutes.

Skaftafell’s Glacier

Skaftafell’s Glacier

Throughout my internship, I was able to photograph and pursue a myriad of activities including cliff jumping, ATV-ing, snowmobiling, whale watching, kayaking, snorkeling, and one of my ultimate favorites: glacier climbing. I spent four hours on this particular glacier, yet had the opportunity to get comfortable in crampons on a few other glaciers across the country. Towards the end of my stay, I helped photograph a music video for the Icelandic band Árstíðir on top of Langjökull, making some of my favorite memories of Iceland on glaciers.

Þingvellir National Park

Þingvellir National Park

Þingvellir is an almost reverent spot for many Icelanders, as the first parliament was established here. One can also find Silfra in the park, a fissure between the North American and Eurasian tectonic plates where I snorkeled in melted glacial water. Very cold.

Harpa

Harpa

I spent an inordinate amount of time in Iceland’s wilderness, feeling kind of like the female version of the film “Into the Wild”. It can get pretty lonely in lava fields and volcanic valleys, so occasionally checking in with civilization was nice. Because my apartment was based in Reykjavik, I spent a few evenings per week exploring the city. One of my favorite locations? Harpa, the famous concert hall along the shore. The building is a bit controversial as the government used taxpayer’s money to finish the hall during the recession, but the staff at Harpa is wonderful: you can roam the hallways in a wedding gown or muddy boots and a filthy jacket… all visitors are welcome.

Guido Van Helten's Graffiti

Guido Van Helten’s Graffiti

One of the best aspects of Reykjavik, besides its eclectic collection of cafes, colorful rooftops, or constant music festivals, is the way in which you can stumble upon beautiful street art at any corner. This particular photo captures the graffiti of Guido Van Helten, an Australian artist who was constantly arrested for tagging in Melbourne before pursuing a visual arts degree in Brisbane and re-defining graffiti through commissioned works throughout the world.

All images by Natasha Azevedo, Prospect Contributing Writer

PHOTOJOURNAL: THE YOUNG FACES OF HAMAKUYA VILLAGE, SOUTH AFRICA

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By Michelle Bulterys
Senior Editor

This past summer I was fortunate enough to conduct medical-anthropological research in the HaMakuya Village in the Limpopo Province of South Africa. During my stay, I spent the majority of my time playing soccer and learning the traditional dance from the wonderful children of the community. The following photos depict a few faces of the many children that had such an incredible impact on my life. They are captioned by quotes which were said in Venda (the local language) at the time the pictures were taken.

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“Mpo! (Gift)”

The child in the picture is named Mpo, which means “Gift” in TshiVenda. He is six years old and dreams of being a professional photographer. Mpo is also the name I was given by my host mother upon arriving in HaMakuya Village. I earned the name by chasing a chicken and serving it to the family for dinner.

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“I dani (Follow me)”

Her name is Blessing, and she is only two years old. She is the sassiest girl I have ever met. She became very bored as her father, my host father, gave me a tour of his traditional healing garden. The garden had a myriad of flowers, barks, roots and leaves that each had a healing purpose (for example, chewing Tenu bark has the ability to make you become irresistible to your spouse). Blessing tugged on my shirt repeating, “i dani,” meaning, “follow me”. She guided me to a dead wild cat, which had been trapped overnight. Her father explained that he uses the jaw to hang as a necklace on his children when they sleep to prevent them from grinding their teeth.

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“Ndi A Awela (Sit down)”

Whatever Blessing wanted, she got. The five of us children had stepped just 20 feet out of our home on the way to the watering hole before Blessing pulled an empty tin from the wheel-barrow and instructed all of us to sit. She always hated the four-mile trek to retrieve water every day. I quickly learned that she loved the trek if she got to sit in the wheel-barrow while I pushed her and made car sounds. I grew very strong arm muscles.

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Zwino (This moment)”

I looked into Tati’s eyes and asked her, “When are you really happy?” Her response was “zwino,” meaning “this moment,” or “right now”. I took a picture for us both to remember the moment, and developed it for her when I went into town one day. I was one of the few foreigners to have ever come to the village. I helped her with her schoolwork at night, and in exchange she taught me how to skin mpani worms and make fire with sticks.

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“Ndi Ani Funa (I love you)”

This photo of Thanyani (age 7) and Zembe (age 8) was taken just after our soccer team won a game on my last day in the village. They had become my brothers, and on that day would always say “Ndi ani funa” to me, which I later found out meant, “I love you”. The soccer field in HaMakuya Village was slanted and had three trees in the middle, and was where we spent the majority of our days.