IGCC DIRECTOR SUSAN SHIRK


PROSPECT had the pleasure of interviewing Susan Shirk, Director of the University of California’s Institute on Global Conflict and Cooperation at the 2009 Model United Nations Conference at UCSD.

(Click here for more interviews)

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One response to “IGCC DIRECTOR SUSAN SHIRK

  1. I’m glad Prospect got the chance to sit down with Susan Shirk, and this video is artistic and modern, but personally I felt like it lacked content – especially considering the amount of experience and insight that I’m sure Professor Shirk has. I think it was heavily edited to get some soundbites, but taken out of the context of an actual conversation it was hard to follow the message(s).

    Creative – yes.
    Visually appealing – yes.
    Intellectually stimulating – not really (for me)

    I don’t mean to be overly critical. I think this style is refreshing, and it’s good to try new things. And having recently edited a video I know how incredibly long and difficult that process is, so in terms of video work I give props. But I have to be straight, I don’t come to Prospect to watch short, snappy videos. I come to get depth and perspective, and this really fell short of that for me.

    “I guess I would suggest that we LOOK AT THE BIG PICTURE and not just what’s in the headlines.”

    What is the big picture (as Shirk or even the editor sees it)? I mean, I don’t mean to be flippant, but what was the point of this interview or this video?

    And I also have to point out that I find it interesting (and a little unsettling) that the makers of this video chose to input images of missiles and rows of stoic and homogenous-looking military personnel at around 1:00 in the video with Shirk saying,

    “..to encourage China to stop being a proliferater of missile and nuclear technology…”

    Actually, the images of the Chinese military men flashes right when Shirk says “proliferater.” As a student of media studies I could go on and on about how loaded that is and how that technique is used often as propaganda and such things take the guise of news to create fear, irrational associations, suspicion, etc. This kind of loaded/insinuating imagery and language is used often on Fox News and in relation to many controversial issues, such as the Iraq War. I suppose I shouldn’t be surprised to find it in a college video like this, but still, it is a bit unsettling. Oh my god! Look at all those Chinese proliferating soldiers with their..missiles. Give me a break. Do you know who holds on the most nuclear weapons on the planet? I’ll give you a hint. It’s not those Chinese men with rifles.

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